PRACTICE PERFECTS RULES: NAME IT, INTEGRATE THE SKILL, MODEL AND DESCRIBE

 

PRACTICE PERFECT RULE #11: NAME IT

  1. Name each skill or technique you have identified as an important building block for outstanding performance.
  2. Monitor the use of this shared vocabulary: use the names, ask staff to use them, and then ensure that the names are being used correctly.


Create a name for warm-ups, technique drill, and specific learned skills.

 

 

PRACTICE PERFECT RULE #12: INTEGRATE THE SKILL

 

  1. Integrate the Skills After teaching discrete skills, create practice that places the skills in situations participants could face in the game.
  2.  Create practice that helps people learn to match the right skills to the right situations.
  3.  Consider simulating the performance environment to ensure that successful practice translates to successful performance.

You have named the skill, now create as close as possible, the performance environment (scrimmage) to perfect matching the right skill for the moment.  So, all of the technique and drill work is very important — don’t just play or sing through your songs. Name the skills needed and isolate them for easy integration into your performance– drill them. 

PERFECT PRACTICE RULE #15:  MODEL AND DESCRIBE

With Rule #15, Perfect Practice, begins a section the important teaching tool of modeling.  As a choral teacher this is a tool that I use often. But I also think it very important for private students of piano and voice to find good models.  Attending recitals of professionals or even college level students is very instructive — i.e. announcing the song, stage presence, and observing vocal or piano technique skills.  One can even learn when things are done incorrectly.  We have just completed a summer season of music camps.  The opportunity at these camps to observe faculty and professional performers is a great learning experience — modeling. 

  1. Use modeling to help learners replicate, and use description to help them understand.
  2. Using modeling and description together ensures that learners can flexibly apply what they have learned.


The authors remind us that it is not enough just to model. As teachers, we can guide students by giving an outline or description of what is being modeled. Help them to identify what they are hearing and seeing. Going further we can find appropriate recordings of the music the student is working on or we can record a session of what is being modeled. Why not create a “modeling reference” library of specific skills. 

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Johnny Matlock 217 West 24th Street Hays, Kansas 67601 Phone: 785-623-1412 Email: matlockjc@gmail.com